Subject:  Luna Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Flintstone, MD
Date: 06/02/2020
Time: 12:01 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  I don’t need this identified but thought I would share! Found this gem last night attached to my screen door. I was amazed by it’s beauty. After looking online I figured out it is a Luna Moth. Woke up this morning and he was on the wooden door frame of my screen door so I got some better pics of it. The pics I took last night didn’t turn out very good so I was excited when I saw he was still here!
How you want your letter signed:  Megan

Luna Moth

Thanks Megan,
We love posting images of Luna Moths.

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Giant type chunky moth thing
Geographic location of the bug:  Scotland
Date: 06/03/2020
Time: 04:39 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  On my dairy staircase this morning I woke up to find a giant moth type thing. It’s is huge computed to a moth and much chunkier. About half the size of my hand. Some
Googling shows maybe a hawk moth but I’m in Scotland not the tropics. I’m central Scotland near Glasgow.
How you want your letter signed:  Nicola Smith

Poplar Hawkmoth

Dear Nicola,
This impressive moth is a Poplar Hawkmoth.  According to Butterfly Conservation:  “Female comes to light before midnight, the male after midnight, in greater numbers. Rests with abdomen curved up and hindwings further forward than the forewings.”

Subject:  Name of moth/butterfly
Geographic location of the bug:  Alicante, Spain
Date: 05/06/2020
Time: 09:27 AM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello,
I have two of these beauties flying around our garden, one male one female as they have been trying to mate the last couple of days.
Does anyone recognise them? I’ve lived in Spain 15 years and never seen them here before.
They are lovely.
Thank you
How you want your letter signed:  Michaela

Butterfly Moth

Dear Michaela,
This is a Butterfly Moth,
Paysandisia archon, a South American species that has been introduced to Europe.  According to the Invasive Species Compendium, it:  “is a Neotropical species indigenous to South America: Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay. In Europe it has been reported from Bulgaria, Cyprus, Denmark, France, Italy, Greece, Slovenia, Spain and the UK.”

Butterfly Moth

What's That Bug? does not endorse extermination

Subject:  Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Fonhadela, Vila Real, Portugal.
Date: 05/22/2020
Time: 02:41 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hello.I have been trying to identify this moth. But I do not know if it is Hemaris fuciformis or H.thysbe. Which one have I photographed? And what is the difference between both species?
Thank you. Isabel.
How you want your letter signed:  Informal

Broad Bordered Bee Hawkmoth

We believe this is a Broad Bordered Bee Hawkmoth, Hemaris fuciformis, and not Hemaris thysbe, a new world species.  It is pictured on Sphingidae of the Western Palaearctic and on Insecta.pro where it states:  “It flies from late May to early July.”

Subject:  Very Large Unusual Moth
Geographic location of the bug:  Leicestershire
Date: 05/31/2020
Time: 04:45 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi there, I saw this huge moth in the middle of the day, on the pavement outside my house. It was struggling to fly. Any ideas what it is? I’ve never seen anything like it!
How you want your letter signed:  Kerry

Privet Hawkmoth

Dear Kerry,
According to UK Moths, the Privet Hawkmoth is your
largest resident hawk-moth, which is distributed in the southern half of Britain, and has distinctive pink and black barring on the body.  The similarly-striped hindwings are often concealed.  It frequents woodland and suburban habitats, and flies in June and July, with a single generation.”

Subject:  Yellow or Anise Swallowtail
Geographic location of the bug:  West Los Angeles
Date: 05/14/2020
Time: 05:47 PM EDT
Your letter to the bugman:  Hi Bugman,
Is this a yellow swallowtail or an anise swallowtail (or are they the same)? She’s laying her eggs on a fennel plant.
Thanks,
How you want your letter signed:  Jeff Bremer

Anise Swallowtail Ovipositing

Dear Jeff,
Please forgive our tardy response.  According to the Jeffrey Glassberg book
Butterflies Through Binoculars The West, the Anise Swallowtail has both a dark and a light or yellow form, and they are not designated as  distinct subspecies.  The two color forms exist over much of the species’ range.  According to BugGuide, there are two subspecies and BugGuide notes:  “There has been a lot of debate over the years as to whether the inland populations of P. zelicaon are different enough to consider as a distinct subspecies from ‘typical’ zelicaon from closer to the Pacific. Also, it is debated, assuming there is a difference, just what the difference is, and where one population begins and the other ends.”  We always appreciate your butterfly submissions and we are tagging this submission of an Anise Swallowtail as our Bug of the Month for June 2020.  As a side note, Daniel was excited to find a young Anise Swallowtail caterpillar on a dill umbel in his garden and he watched it grow over the course of a week, only to have it vanish.  The suspected culprit is a Paper Wasp seen patrolling the dill plant the day the caterpillar vanished.